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English 35
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)
have my two science leaders, [inaudible] and janet gray, so science questions galor, they can handle them all, policy questions, we'll have to deflect some of those to nancy for another time, so what i'm going to present today is what we call our healthy home and healthy world tours, i'll talk a little bit about who the breast cancer fund is and then we're going to walk through kind of the rooms in your home talking about tips for avoiding exposures that are linked to breast cancer and i will talk a little bit about the different chemicals, where they're found, things you can do to avoid them and also some policies, and then we'll kind of go beyond the home to talk about the kinds of exposures that might be not within our control in the house but elsewhere. and it looks like i have videos so that is good. so, the breast cancer fund is a national organization that works to prevent breast cancer by eliminating the environmental exposures linked o the disease, mostly we talk about chemicals and radiation that are linked to breast cancer, we are a little different from your breast cancer
decline in three years. in fact, the number of deals were also down 6%. clean technology and life sciences were among the hardest hit sectors. >> what's behind this decline, and what does it mean forthcoming year? is it a big worry as america tries to lead in innovation? joining us brad weinberg of blueprint health, here with us at the new york stock exchange, an accelerator that funds primarily health i.t. startups, and john baackes is also with us of new atlantic ventures which invests mostly in mobile technology and e-commerce. john, we'll start with you. how much of this decline had to do with concerns of the fiscal cliff at the end of last year? what do you think? >> the decline, bill, if you take a look at it, was completely represented in the clean tech sector and the life sciences sector. the sectors we invest in are software and internet. this was the best year, 2012, for software investments since 2001. it was the second best year for internet investments since 2001. so the total picture might look grim, but in the space of technology. software and internet, it's a good story. >>
or -- yeah? >> i believe so, is that true? yes, my science advisors, that's why they're here. >> [inaudible]. >> yeah. there are a lot of carcinogens in diesel exhaust, yeah. >> [inaudible]. >> well, you're still seeing an oil that combusts, some of them we know burn more cleanly than others but if it's combusting, you end up with productions of combustion, it may not be better for pollution on the other side, depending on how clean the air burns and that's a theme we end up talking about a fair bit unfortunately is that bio doesn't always mean it's safer, it can, it can definitely mane we're reducing destruction of greenhouse gases but it can still make bad things outs of good ingredients if you know what i mean, another outdoor thing is to reduce your reliance on household pesticides so the active ingredients can be of concern, the pesticide itself, but most pesticide companies done label what are called the inert ingredient, that's the one that's not doing the pest killing per se, they can still really be bad chemicals, endocrine sdrukt tersest can be there, your baby crawls on your lawn
annual conference on science, policy, and the environment, disasters in the environment. i'm the executive director of a national council of the science of the environment, and it is my distinct master of ceremonies for much of the conference. thank you for coming. lots of people are still outside, encourage them to come in and settle themselves down. super storm sandy, drought on agriculture, wildfires, the earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear reactor accident in japan last year, haiti earthquake, the list is long and worrying. in 20 # 11, we had more disasters in the united states costing more than a billion dollars than ever. in fact, we had more expensive disasters, but not quite as many in 2012. the drought and the super storm were hugely, hugely expensive. disasters are happening with greater frequency, greater severity, and absolutely with many, many greater costs. we ray -- we are here over the next three days to work across traditional boundaries to connect scientists of all stripes with practitioners, with policymakers from the international to the local level with co
change and the announcement of science deniers was lauded by the left. of course it had to be. let's listen to the president say something that i don't think has been said before. >> we, the people, still believe that our obligations as americans are not just to the ourselves but to all posterity. we will respond to the threat of climate change knowing that the failure to do so would betray our children and future generations. some may still deny the overwhelming judgment of science, but none can avoid the devastating impact of raging fires and crippling drought and more powerful storms. the path towards sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult, but america cannot resist this transition. we must lead it. >> well, rush limbaugh challenged him today because people were listening to rush are driving cars and using up fossil fuel and they're not driving smart cars or priuses. no, they're driving big gas burners, but the fact is there's still that sort of no-nothingism, if you will, that -- i'm trying to think of the great word. you don't believe in anything. ludd
are looking at fourth and eighth graders, fourth graders in reading and mathematics and science and eight the greatest in mathematics and science. >host: we have special number set up if you want to join this conversation -- what do we learn as we dig into help fourth graders and eighth graders are doing? guest: the broad strokes over view, we see that our fourth graders, they're reading has improved as well as mathematics but their silence is largely not changed compared to the previous administration. over the longer term, they have improved and their eight th graders have not improved much. in general, the assessments compare the u.s. to a variety of countries and education systems within countries. some of our state's took the assessment independently along with the u.s. total. when you look over the entire set, i would say the u.s. among these countries shows up in the top 10 or 12 countries or systems. host: we can see who was included in the fourth grade reading study. why these countries? guest: they are given the same tests so much of the efforts in an international asset as maki
the dark powers of destruction unleashed by science engulf all humanity in planned or accidental self-destruction. we dare not tempt them with weakness. for only when our arms are sufficient beyond doubt can we be certain beyond doubt that they will never be employed. but neither can two great and powerful groups of nations take comfort from our present course both sides overburdened by the cost of modern weapons, both rightly alarmed by the steady spread of the deadly atom, yet both racing to alter that uncertain balance of terror that stays the hand of mankind's final war. so let us begin anew -- remembering on both sides that civility is not a sign of weakness, and sincerity is always subject to proof. let us never negotiate out of fear. but let us never fear to negotiate. let both sides explore what problems unite us instead of belaboring those problems which divide us. let both sides, for the first time, formulate serious and precise proposals for the inspection and control of arms and bring the absolute power to destroy other nations under the absolute control of all nations. le
have got even very good at the science of this. it's not perfect, and i think one of the reasons that this is coming out is because it's obvious that it's not perfect, but it's good enough to catch people. lance armstrong has been caught. jenna: a quick follow-up to this, since you were working with this agency since 1999, did you have any indication, i mean did you feel like you had information that was for sure that he was doing this. and just couldn't peg it on him? what was it like inside the agency? well, we really don't get involved in our committee as to the various case ed casess that are being prosecuted. we are more involved with what constitutes a doping offense. a doping offense does not necessarily mean a positive drug terbgs it can be other violations of the process with the same sanctions. jenna: a quick final question to the doctor then i want you to weigh into this as well. based on what you no about the races and what kind of substances might be used, how many people would it take to elude these types of tests. >> it's a rather complex business. it's sophisticat
been a time of proud achievement. we have made enormous strides in science and industry and agriculture. we have shared our wealth more broadly than ever. we have learned at last to manage a modern economy to assure its continued growth. we have given freedom new reach. we have begun to make its promise real for black as well as for white. we see the hope of tomorrow in the youth of today. i know america's youth. i believe in them. we can be proud that they are better educated, more committed, more passionately driven by conscience than any generation in our history. no people has ever been so close to the achievement of a just and abundant society, or so possessed of the will to achieve it. and because our strengths are so great, we can afford to appraise our weaknesses with candor and to approach them with hope. standing in this same place a third of a century ago, franklin delano roosevelt addressed a nation ravaged by depression and gripped in fear. he could say in surveying the nation's troubles -- "they concern, thank god, only material things." our crisis today is in reverse. we
't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [ male announcer ] how do you make 70,000 trades a second... ♪ reach one customer at a time? ♪ or help doctors turn billions of bytes of shared information... ♪ into a fifth anniversary of remission? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. >>> on "mad money" we are searching for bull markets. not just the loud ones. the bull markets get a lot of media attention. sometimes the best bull markets are the ones that are under the radar. suddenly you look over and the stock you never heard of had a new high after a new high after a new high. i don't think anyone in the audience has thought about it. i'm talking about the market in packaging. the industry has been on fire. if you are a food company, you know that new companies can drive sales that allows the food to last longer. and in this business it comes down to two companies that you never heard of. bms, joked about to stand for buy my stock. and berry plastics group. which became public last october. ips down 5
aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by using fedex ground and buy my own supplies. that's a great idea. i'm going to go... we got clients in today. [ male announcer ] save on ground shipping at fedex office. >>> you're looking at a live shot of the white house where the president and first lady are getting ready for the two inaugural balls this evening. it's been an incredible day. and there has been one person along with him every step of the way. the first lady. we'll talk about her next four years next. new prilosec otc wildberry is the same frequent heartburn treatment as prilosec otc. now with a fancy coating that gives you a burst of wildberry flavor. now why make a flavored heartburn pill? because this is america. and we don't just make things you want, we make things you didn't even know you wanted. like a spoon fork. spray cheese. and jeans mad
him, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> it's time for the power r rundown with john carney. nicolas sarkozy and his supermodel wife considering moving to london according to reports to avoid the tax. 75% in france. gerard depardieu now a resident. tip of the riiceberg? >> i can't blame anyone escaping a 75% tax rate. i would love to see sarkozy in buttoned-up london. could you see him ogling kate middleton? >> the british press would love it. john? >> i think there will be more of this. and i think we will see push back, some of the higher tax governments in europe say we need tax harmization. that won't happen, but we'll see a push for it. >> topic number two, this involves our poll. we asked all of you out there via yahoo! finance should companies be allowed to limit what employees say about them on social media sites? 18% of you said yes, it's meant to protected the company and employees. 21% said, no, workers have the right to speak freely online. 61% said employees need to u
. political science will look at the system and say, what is wrong with this. the historian will look at it and say, how to get this way -- how did it this way. we tend to be less active in suggesting changes to the system. floyd riddick said, the rules of the senate are perfect. what he meant by that was, the senators have exclusive control over writing their own rules. these are the rules that have written, and this is what i carry out. if the want to change them, they will change and to fit their circumstances. -- and them to fit their circumstances. the have been filibustering since 1789. -- they have been filibustering since 1789. the senate and house have developed in remarkably different ways over time. the constitution said, each house to right the wrong roles. age house can write their own rules. -- the house can write their own rules. you come to the senate. the rules of the senate have always given much more muscle to the minority. sometimes it is the minority party. sometimes it is a minority faction inside a minority part to says, "i object," and everything stops. every s
danahur, to the upside, likes testing measurement. this company is doing work with life sciences, with embryo banks, with things that are just so blow away, that people want gene sequencing. this is a real company. it is an american company and it's great. >> amazing what the revolution that's under way. you'll be able to take your dna with you on your ipad. >> that's exactly them. >> keep in mind, if you pencil out the numbers above 65 for an lbo, it's pretty tough. here there is not a large shareholder who is going to roll everything in with even more money outside. let's keep an eye on it. interesting situation. certainly wanted to point it out. the stock up almost 10%. >> coming up next, apple's recent slide, due to investors being dissatisfied with their own lives. and the ceo of zylinx. the early movers here on wall street. >>> over at the nasdaq, we're awaiting the first trade for norwegian cruise lines, pricing above the range at $19 a share. it had been $16 to $18 a share. this is a hot space over the past year. royal caribbean, up 30% in the last year. carnival up 11%.
, that it's better not to know. we need to know and it's worth studying, and we should embrace the science and allow the research to go forward so we can learn more about the effect of violence in the entertainment industry -- depicted through entertainment -- and the impact it may or may not have on society and on children. so that was a very specific item that he did include as part of his package. and i think generally, the proposals the president put forward yesterday were recognized as fairly substantive and comprehensive, and that's one of them. >> very last thing, on the debt ceiling. republicans like pat toomey have suggested that you should prioritize what debts you pay off so that things like social security get paid -- payments. as the president said in his press conference last week, he wants them to be paid; wants to make sure people don't lose their benefits. why not prioritize those payments? i just want to give you a chance to respond to the republican plan that's out there. >> sure. well, there's not a specific plan; there's somebody talking about it. but let's be real her
in the foods and nutritious food ingredients areas. i think those areas are areas where innovation and science really bring a difference to the customers, and they're taking it up and they're utilizing it. i think other areas, there's a wait and see attitude. you know, are we, in this country, going to deal with our deficit? you know, as china comes through their transition in power, they're the two biggest hurdles i see in front of us that we still have to clear to create a real strong economic environment for the world. >> so, the deficit, and the talk that we've heard now coming out of washington, is that we're going to push things back, the debt ceiling will be pushed off essentially for three months. is that good news or bad news? i mean what would you like to see happen right away? >> well, i do think that that just continues the uncertainty. you know, i think if there's a time frame and a time line and they can make real progress that that's a positive. i think to the extent that they just keep -- if they keep moving it out i think that's going to be a negative. you know, certainly it's
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back. 90 seconds left here. the dow opened lower this morning and finishing higher. a gain of about 28 points. one bullish indicator and one bearish indicator. the bullish indicator. dow transportation average looks like it's going to close at an all-time high today. trust me. that's a bullish indicator. the bearish indicator, the volatility index, the fear indicator at a 52-week low. one-year chart of the vix, at
and studying political science. this is the fight back we are talking about. please say a quick word about what it is like trying to navigate through poverty when you are a single mom and what you say to all of those single moms watching right now trying to navigate the same journey. >> thank you for having me. it is not easy to be able to come and leave my baby back. i was feeling sad. i did not want to leave him. this is a fight for plenty of women, and not only single mothers. single fathers out there as well that struggle just as much as i do. [applause] i know plenty of them and they struggle. picture this. you are a single parent, but you have to come up with a way how to feed your family, work at the same time to pay bills, and go to school to get an education to better your life. last year, i only made $8,000 the whole year. my food stamps were cut. that was the only way i was able to feed my son, $85 a month. the average spent -- average family spends close to $500 or more. you expect me to spend $85 and live with that for my son. we had to be sent to a shelter because my mother no lon
on the filibuster? >> there is a division between political scientists and historians about this. political science will look at the system and say, what is wrong with this. the historian will look at it and say, how did it get way. we tend to be less active in suggesting changes to the system. floyd riddick said, the rules of the senate are perfect. what he meant by that was, the senators have exclusive control over writing their own rules. these are the rules that have written, and this is what i carry out. if the want to change them, they will change them to fit their circumstances. they have been filibustering since 1789. the senate and house have developed in remarkably different ways over time. the constitution said, each house can write their own rules. you come to the senate. the rules of the senate have always given much more muscle to the minority. sometimes it is the minority party. sometimes it is a minority faction inside a minority part to says, "i object," and everything stops. every senate majority leader is under a lot of burden to try to get a very uncooperative organization to wo
may still deny the overwhelming judgment of science but none can avoid the devastating impact of raging fires and crippling drought and more powerful storms. >> former vice president al gore, a sometimes critic of the president's environmental efforts, writes in his blog his forceful commitment to take action will rekindle the hopes of so many that we are at long last approaching the political tipping point beyond which we will finally start transforming our economy to sharply reduce global warming, pollution and safeguard the future. let's bring in democratic strategist and pollster margie o'mara and senior vice president with the winston group, myra miller. good morning. margie, the president wants to focus on what he can do administratively with executive orders although he does plan simultaneously to campaign for public support. very different strategy than he used in his first term, isn't it? >> well, yeah. i think the lesson really here for both obama and for congress is that voters want people to come to the table and find compromise on whatever the issue, whether it's
and deficit reduction. he spoke at the briefing today hosted by the christian science monitor for an hour. >> thanks for coming. i'm dave cook from the monitor. welcome to the first breakfast of the new year. the guest is representative sander levin of michigan cranking member of the house ways and means committee. this is the first visit of the group. he did for deily to detroit native and the university of chicago, master's and international relations of columbia and a law degree from harvard who was elected in the michigan state senate in 1964 and served as a senate minority leader during the carter administration he was assistant administrator of the agency for international development elected to the house in 1982. for four years after his brother carl was elected to the senate. in march, 2010, representative levin one the gavel of the chairman of the ways and means committee. in the biographical portion of the program now on to the thrilling portion. as always we are on the record please, no blogging and tweeting while the breakfast is underway. there is no embargo when the breakfas
with musicales and militias, no single person can train all the math and science teachers we'll need to equip our children for the future or builds the roads and networks and research labs that will bring jobs and businesses to our shores. now, more than ever, we must do these things together as one nation and one people. this generation of americans has been tested by crise, is that steal our resolve and proved our resistance. decade of war is now ending. an economic recovery has begun, america's possibilities are limitless for we possess all the qualities that this world without boundaries demands. youth and drive, adversity and openness. endless capacity for risk and a gift for re-invention. my fellow americans, we are made for this moment and we will seize it as long as we seize it together. for we, the people, understand that our country cannot succeed when a shrinking few do very well in a growing many barely make it. we believe the prosperity must rest on the pros parrots of the thriving middle class. we know that america thrives when every person can find independence and plied in their w
, and advanced third world country. we're leading in science and technology, but not for the people. mass of a literary power. if you look at the condition that 85% of the country, it is terrible. >> i'm looking right now at those who are walking to their seats. timothy geithner, the outgoing treasury secretary. eric holder, the attorney general. their seats on the west front of the capital, about to witness the second inauguration of president obama. jenna napolitano's, the former governor of arizona, the secretary of homeland security. eric holder, the attorney general. comet, for example, on timothy geithner are. not only timothy geithner, but jack lew, who has been nominated by president obama to be the next secretary treasurer, and how that fits into the issue you're so deeply concerned about right now with minimum wage. >> a lot of liberal democrats filled with extraordinary help think, well, clinton's second term he does not have to worry. obama doesn't have to worry about re-election so it can be different. it is not one to be different. unless the people wake up in this country a
of momentum as we identify with the life sciences, energy, natural resources, liquidities all in terms of fm services or retail and goods. and a deal supported by the practices like business obligation services, bpo and also i.t. and cost structure and supported by advanced technologies like cloud, mobility, mobility, these are the services which will enable customers to be able to use their business models. >> and we will leave it there. thank you so much, sir, for your time this morning. >>> now, staying in asia, in japan, exporters helped fuel a market surge in tokyo on the back of weakness. toshiko is here with more on what's keeping the currency down. do we expect this to continue? >> yeah, kelly, it has a lot to do with what the bank of japan does next week. the market is clearly banking on mormon tear stimulus. the yen fell against the dollar, hit ago 2 1/2 year mark. the nikkei is reporting that the boj is preparing mormon tear easing. possible moves include a roughly $200 billion expansion over the boj's asset purchase program. this would be the first time in more than nine years th
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> this will be difficult. there will be pundits and politicians and special interest lobbyists publicly warning of a tyrannical all-out assault on liberty. not because that's true but because they want to gin up fear or higher ratings or revenue for themselves. the only way we will be able to change is if their audience, their constituents, their membership says this time must be different. that this time we must do something to protect our communities and our kids. weapons designed for the theater of war have no place in a movie theater. a majority of americans agree with us on this. and by the way, so did ronald reagan, one of the staunchest defenders of the second amendment, who wrote to congress in 1994 urging them -- this is ronald reagan speaking -- urging them to listen to the american public and to the law enforcement community and support a ban on the further manufacture of military-style assault weapons. >> all right. welcome back to "morning joe." a live look at the whit
are a mother of a young child. she is a student at northeastern university and studying political science. this is the fight back we are talking about. please say a quick word about what it is like trying to navigate through poverty when you are a single mom and what you say to all of those single moms watching right now trying to navigate the same journey. >> thank you for having me. it is not easy to be able to come and leave my baby back. i was feeling sad. i did not want to leave him. this is a fight for plenty of women, and not only single mothers. single fathers out there as well that struggle just as much as i do. [applause] i know plenty of them and they struggle. picture this. you are a single parent, but you have to come up with a way how to feed your family, work at the same time to pay bills, and go to school to get an education to better your life. last year, i only made $8,000 the whole year. my food stamps were cut. that was the only way i was able to feed my son, $85 a month. the average family spends close to $500 or more. you expect me to spend $85 and live with that for
may still deny the overwhelming judgment of science, but none can avoid the devastating impact of raging fires and crippling drought and more powerful storms. the path towards sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult. but america cannot resist this transition. we must lead it! >> all right. so, for david maraniss, for some inside the echo chamber, there might have been some concern that there wasn't enough reaching out by the president to republicans on spending, on fiscal issues. but isn't this speech, the second inaugural, more to lay down markers for even generations to come, and then we have the state of the union, where perhaps he can address some of the short, and i mean, in the grand scheme of things, the short-term issues that our country faces. >> i think that's true. and i also think that this speech was ideological, but he's a pragmatic president. and so i think that not everything that he said in the speech -- you know, he said that it's going to be imperfect. the solutions will be imperfect. he's not going to try to please every constituency.
. we'll restore science to its rightful place and wield technology's wonders to raise health care's use and lower its cost. >> here we are four years later. why not come back to the dubliner? all you did too. my, lord. the line goes around the block. a wonderful, joyful crowd. thank you all for coming. joining us now with the politico playbook, the politico executive director jim. >> i'm always a dose of sunshine in the morning. you guys were talking about ted cruz and his comments on gun control. i think what people need to realize, ted cruz is a mainstream republican with this senate and this house. his views, he's not on the conserveative edge of the party. that is the party. when you think about the budget, think about gun control -- >> saying the president exploited the death of 6 and 7-year-olds within minutes? >> i think a lot of republicans wouldn't say it like that but they'd say something similar. >> he's on "meet the press" for his first time. this is his introduction. he makes a political attack that you would expect in a campaign for dogcatcher in the b
of science and in varmint posts a form of disasters and the environment. after remarks from the head of fema, there'll be a discussion on the effects of hurricane katrina and the tsunami in japan. that is at 8:30 eastern. and c-span2 at 9:00 a.m., the ceo -- the brookings institution conference on the economy. guests will include the chairman of alcoa, procter and gamble, and and nike. >> student camp video entries with your message to the president are now due. get them to cease and by this friday for your chance at the grand prize of $5,000. there is $50,000 in total prices. go to studentcam.org. >> president obama told reporters at the white house that he would be open to using an executive order to raise the legal limit to pay its bills. he also talked about reducing gun violence. president of the united states. >> please have a seat. good morning. i thought it might make sense to take some questions this week as my first term comes to an end. it has been a busy and productive for years. i expect the same thing from i expect the same thing from the
are published in "nature geo science" and may push the search for ancient life on mars underground. >>> off-duty police officer in madrid is being credited as a hero this morning after rescuing a woman who fainted and fell on the city's subway tracks. the officer leaped into action and pulled the 52-year-old woman to safety. an oncoming train saw the trouble on the tracks and fortunately was able to stop in time. lucky day all right. it is now 7:12. let's go back to matt, savannah, and al. >> that's a nasty fall. natalie, thanks very much. here's the deal. you want to get the attention of the president and the vice president on inaugural day. what do you do? who are you going to call? >> there's really only one person you call. al roker. it happened to him yesterday. all he really needed was a teeny, tiny bit of encouragement from brian williams and david gregory. take a look. >> no pressure on al roker, but anything -- >> really? >> -- less than an interview will be considered a failure. >> thank you very much. i think we can pretty much assume it's going to be a failure. >> a strong point
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)